Saturday, November 10, 2012

Breakfast LInks: Week of November 5, 2012

Saturday, November 10, 2012
After a fortnight's hiatus, the Breakfast Links are back! We're offering up a tasty serving of links to web sites, photographs, blogs posts, and other assorted goodies, gathered for you this week from Twitter.
• Fantastic story from London Times 1796: girl in boy's clothes on the run from wicked stepmother is press-ganged into Navy.
• Ancient princess's tomb discovered in Egypt.
The Spinster Book: "Notes on Men" from 1901.
• Lovely photo of stained glass window in the Burns Club in Irvine - like melted toffee with words!
• "A Turtle-feast is equally relished at both Ends of the Town": 18th c. Turtle Mania.
Regency assembly rooms in Birmingham.
• Not just for Halloween: a bat hat, c. 1916-18.
• Elegant toothpick cases: are they handsome enough to tempt Robert Ferrars?
Fire over England, 1605.
• Niccolo Machiavelli, the cunning critic of political reason.
• The secret lives of kitchen spices: nutmeg repels fleas *and* the Black Death!
• Sorry, no fur coats: strict listing of what women could (and couldn't) wear as yeowomen in the US Navy, 1918.
• The art of hair.
La Marseillaise in an English satirical print, 10 November 1792.
• Medieval beavers on the run.
• Of heffalumps and hunny: the language of Winnie-the-Pooh. More Pooh in original E.H. Shepard illustrations.
• For British Sausage Week: recipes for making sausages the 18th c. way.
• Beautiful early 20th c. cape with elaborate gold embroidery.
• A virtual wander through Wimpole Hall.
• All aboard for lunch: 1920 menu of the T.S.S. Columbia of the Anchor Line.
The Female Detective, 1864, first crime novel with a lady sleuth, now republished by the British Library.
• Ale, gambling, and dragon's blood: all part of young Humfrey Wanley's life in London, c. 1700.
• An unusual Austen sighting: Mr. Knightley's Gaiters.
• "The sacrifice is not in vain": An American Red Cross nurse writes to the mother of a deceased young soldier, 1918.
Bram Stoker, the father of the modern vampire.
• Seventeenth century household management: making a peacock look like a porcupine, napkin folding, and cooking Eggs a L'intrigue.
Fifth Avenue from start to finish: the 1911 equivalent to Google street view.
• Own a piece of fashion history! Madonna's corset, much more, at auction at Christies.
• The amazing floating bath and glaciarium on the Victorian Thames, 1870s.
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5 comments:

Debbie Watley said...

The letter by the nurse to the soldier's mother was very touching. I imagine Mrs. Hogan cherished it.

Elizabeth Varadan aka Mrs. Seraphina said...

Another great collection. Thanks. I particularly was interested in the kitchen spices (learned a lot!), the photo tour of 5th Avenue, and the snippet of Gary Oldman's Dracula.

Katie said...

Fascinated by the girl who ended up in the navy, and really wish I knew more about her.

Jesse said...

Just wanted to pop in to say that I've been following this blog for a couple weeks, and the Breakfast Links always make my day. Thanks!

Deb said...

Hey you two! - thanks for the shout-out re: Mr. Knightley's gaiters!
Best,
Deb

 
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